Sunday, February 26, 2006

Sunday Listening

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Bob Dylan, Back Pages 1961-1996

Before we get a new focus going, I just wanted to post up this amazing CD's worth of music that I had hoped to upload back when we focused on the music of Bob Dylan. I really can't tell you much about this one, as I have searched the Internet for more info and come up empty. It's a mix of rarities and live versions of classics, covering at least the first 20 years of the man's career. It appears to be an unreleased album, perhaps a demo version of one of the boxed sets that has come out, such as Bootleg Series Volumes 1-3 or Biograph.

If anyone knows what this is, or if there is any thought that I shouldn't be posting it up, please let me know. Otherwise, enjoy it, and make sure to listen to the songs that come in at the 50 minutes mark for two of the most beautiful songs that Dylan has ever sung imo, "I'm Not There" from The Basement Tape Sessions and "Sign on the Window." Be forewarned, this is a very long file, more than 90 MB. I think it's well worth some room on the hard drive, but didn't want anyone to be shocked.

-A huge welcome to all those coming to Pound for Pound via Expecting Rain and Steven T., a link site for Bob Dylan fans. I'm not sure that I am anywhere near qualified to talk about the man, nor that this site will be of much interest in general to readers of that site. But, I would love to hear from some of his fans, as I am sure that there are many opinions and thoughts on one of the most important artists of the 20th Century. Holler. For those who love Dylan, I can't think of a better resource for keeping up on the man, his music and his fans.

-Have you ever wished that you could hear Bob Dylan DJ? Thanks to XM Radio, you now can do just that, as Dylan hosts a weekly radio show with playlists he put together himself. There are commentaries and interviews as well, but I wouldn't tune in expecting a lot of chattiness or Fartman routines. [Via Althouse]

-R.I.P. Mr. Furley

-On the recent Dylan-Dead post, there's now a comment that is in the running for my all-time favorites. How could it not be with phrases "huge dork" and "corndog"? Good work, Anonymous, you've really set the bar high for future assholes writing in.

-Not sure where to go next, as I'm not sure what music is going to pop up next. Tune in, as it can be a surprise to all of us.

8 comments:

Deloney said...

The file is a bit too big for me to download but I do remember "I'm Not There"...I had it on a bootleg. I've never heard a version of it with decent sound quality.

Deloney said...

"I'm Not There"...I had it on a bootleg way back in high school. Great song but terrible sound quality.

Deloney said...

"I'm Not There"...I had it on a bootleg way back in high school. Great song but terrible sound quality.

mister bijou said...

Thanks for the Back Pages... lovely versions of Visions of Joanna, Simple Twist of Fate, Blind Wille McTell, and Desolation Row.

More information about Back Pages is at dylanbase.com:
www.dylanbase.com/specificinfo.asp?albumID=1230

michael99_19560@yahoo.com said...

hey, these dylan tracks that you posted are great. it really gets better from 'simple twist' on...better 'blind' willie than released and 'desperation row' is another great version. i hope i can get this onto a disc somehow!
thanks a lot for posting and thanks to megan carter for posting the posting...michael99_19560@yahoo.com

Dean Boyd said...

Where'd all this Dylan/Grateful Dead stuff come from? Where's all the edgy urban hiphop stuff from bands I never heard of?

Anonymous said...

Mr. Furley????!!!!!

Nip it in the bud, youngster.

Adam said...

I've got this album too and can't seem to figure out where the hell it's from. Thanks for confirming the fact that I'm not insane. And ignore all the people who whine and cry when you venture outside hip-hop. In so many ways the idea of hip-hop as a socially progressive art form was heavily influenced by early folk singers (Guthrie, Seeger, Dylan, etc.) who fought the power long before Public Enemy ever took to the streets.